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Course Descriptions

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BIO-101 General Biology I PDF
This is the first course in a two-semester sequence in general biology. It is designed to explain the fundamental principles of biology and to promote an awareness of their significance to society. Lecture topics include: Introduction to biology, review of basic chemistry, cell biology, genetics, and a survey of Kingdoms Monera, Protista, and Fungi. Laboratory exercises develop proficiency in the use of laboratory equipment and guide students in investigations of cell biology, genetics, and microbiology.

3 lectures, 3 labs, 4 credits
General Education Course

BIO-103 The Human Body PDF
This is a one-semester course that is concerned with basic chemistry, the human cell, tissues, and the musculoskeletal, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. The course includes a survey of metabolism and fluid/electrolyte balance. Lectures are supplemented by writing assignments and discussions. Laboratory exercises include microscopy, dissection, and anatomical and physiological experiments that complement the lecture.

3 lectures, 3 labs, 4 credits
General Education Course

BIO-104 Microbiology PDF
This is a laboratory science course that emphasizes the principles of biology as they apply to microorganisms. The morphology, anatomy, physiology, growth, metabolism, nutrition, control, and identification of the various microbes, genetics including recombination technology, industrial and clinical case studies in microbiology are discussed. Representative laboratory exercises include staining procedures, media preparation, pure culture techniques, culture identification, and serology.

3 lectures, 3 labs, 4 credits
General Education Course

BIO-107 Introduction to Human Biology PDF
This course is a human anatomy and physiology course intended for the non-biology major. Biological principles are taught by examining human body systems, homeostasis, and disease. This information, relevant because it applies to their own bodies, will help students understand medical issues, appreciate the importance of exercise and nutrition in maintaining health, and consider environmental concerns including the health effects of pollution and overpopulation. Laboratory exercises include experimentation, microscopy, and dissection.

3 lectures, 3 labs, 4 credits

BIO-108 Introduction to Environmental Biology PDF
This deals with humans and their interactions with the environment. Topics covered include fundamental aquatic and terrestrial ecology, air and water pollution, world population problems, loss of biodiversity, pesticides, solid waste problems and an extensive review of energy problems and their solutions. Laboratories include measurements of various environmental pollutants, analysis of environmental parameters and descriptive and practical reinforcement of lecture material.

3 lectures, 3 labs, 4 credits
General Education Course

BIO-109 Anatomy and Physiology I PDF
This course is an introduction to the basic principles of human anatomy and physiology that emphasizes some common diseases in relation to the various body systems. Among the topics considered are the basic plan of the body, tissues, the skeletal system, the muscular system, articulations, cardiovascular system, and the respiratory system. Lectures are supplemented by writing assignments, discussion, and laboratory sessions that include dissection and elementary physiology experiments.

3 lectures,3 labs,4 credits
General Education Course

BIO-119 Intensive Wolf Study PDF
This course deals with an organism that represents the conflicts between humans and wildlife management issues. Taught at the International Wolf Center in Ely, Minnesota, during the winter semester break, students will study captive wolves as well as wolves in their natural habitat. Lecture topics include the biology and ecology of the gray wolf, Canis lupus. Afternoon and evening sessions involve field work and independent study. 

<1 lecture, 6 labs, 3 credits

BIO-130 People-Plant Relationships PDF
This course explores the effects of plants on biological organisms that influence human economic, social and psychological behavior. The course will focus on two major themes: 1) plants as sources of food, shelter, clothing, drugs, and industrial raw material; and 2) the influence of plant life on human cultural diversity, biotechnology, medicine, and conservation efforts. 

3 lectures, 3 labs, 4 credits
General Education Course

BIO-131 General Botany PDF
This course is an introduction to the biology of plants. The course includes an analysis of plant structure and function, an explanation of the principles of plant genetics, an exploration of plant evolution, and an examination of plant ecology. The importance of plants to people will be illustrated through discussions of people's ecological and economic dependence upon plants. The course content will be presented through lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory exercises. 

3 lectures, 3 labs, 4 credits
General Education Course

BIO-201 Comparative Anatomy PDF
This course is a study of the body structures of some representative vertebrate animals and of their functional and evolutionary relationships. Laboratory exercises include detailed dissection of the lamprey eel, the dogfish, the mudpuppy, the cat, and other animals.

3 lectures, 3 labs, 4 credits
Prerequisite(s): BIO-101, BIO-203

BIO-202 Embryology PDF
This course is the study of vertebrate embryonic development from gametogenesis and fertilization to the development of the body organs. Laboratory exercises include experiments with living sea urchins, Japanese medaka fish, frogs, and chick embryos, as well as microscopic examination of the various sections of the embryos.

3 lectures, 3 labs, 4 credits
Prerequisite(s): BIO-101, BIO-203

BIO-203 General Biology II PDF
General Biology II explores the evolution and biodiversity of representative organisms in the plant and animal kingdoms. Studies of plants investigate diversity, structure, and the physiology of absorption, transport, and photosynthesis. Students will examine the structure and life cycles of invertebrate and vertebrate animals. In a unit on Ecology, students will learn how living organisms interact with their environment. Laboratory exercises utilizing observation, experimentation, microscopy, and dissection provide practical demonstrations of the topics covered in lecture.

3 lectures, 3 labs, 4 credits
General Education Course
Prerequisite(s): BIO-101

BIO-209 Anatomy and Physiology II PDF
This course continues the study of human anatomy and physiology. Among the topics considered are the digestive system, metabolism, urinary system, fluid and electrolyte balance, the nervous system, the endocrine system, and the reproductive system. Lectures are supplemented by writing assignments, discussion and laboratory sessions that include dissection and elementary physiology experiments.

3 lectures, 3 labs, 4 credits
General Education Course
Prerequisite(s): BIO-109 with a grade of C or better

BIO-210 Introduction to Biotechnology PDF
This course is designed to give students both a theoretical background and a working knowledge of the instrumentation and techniques employed in a biotechnology laboratory. Emphasis will be placed on the introduction of foreign DNA into bacterial cells, as well as the analysis of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) and proteins.

3 lectures, 3 labs, 4 credits
Prerequisite(s): BIO-101

BIO-211 Introduction to Bioinformatics PDF
This course is designed to give students both a theoretical background and a working knowledge of the techniques employed in bioinformatics. Emphasis will be placed on biological sequence (DNA, RNA, protein) analysis and its applications. 

2 lectures, 2 labs, 3 credits
Prerequisite(s): BIO-101 and BIO-210


BIO-227 Principles of Ecology PDF
This course deals with terrestrial and aquatic ecology. Topics covered include abiotic characteristics of ecosystems as well as detailed discussions of populations, communities, ecosystems and biomes. Discussions also include such topics as ecological succession and paleoecology. Qualitative and quantitative data of ecosystems is gathered during the early part of the semester in which ecological data will be collected during field experiences. These data will be analyzed during the second half of the semester in the laboratory. Statistical analysis and report writing will also be stressed.

3 lectures, 3 labs, 4 credits
Prerequisite(s): BIO-101, BIO-203

BIO-228 Introduction to Marine Biology
This course deals with a basic introduction to marine environments, emphasizing ecological principles governing marine life throughout the world. Topics include basic oceanography, marine ecological systems, planktonic communities, deep-sea biology, subtidal and intertidal ecology, estuarine and coral reef communities, human impact, mariculture and pollution. Lab sessions will include in-house lab exercises, field experiences, analysis of data, group projects and report writing.

3 lectures, 3 labs, 4 credits
Prerequisite(s): BIO-101, BIO-203

BIO-229 Tropical Marine Ecology
This course covers characteristics of populations, communities, and ecosystems found in tropical regions. Taught at the Keys Marine Laboratory in Long Key, Florida, during the summer semester, students study coral reef structure and ecology, the intertidal zone, mangrove and terrestrial communities, interstitial organisms, and atrophic relationships. Lab sessions include field experiences, group projects and report writing. 

3 lectures, 3 labs, 4 credits
Prerequisite(s): BIO-101, BIO-203